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he committed the u.s. to this at all, and why he thought it was a good idea. >> america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. in this particular country, libya, at this particular moment we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. and the international mandate for action, a broad coalition prepared to join us, the support of arab countries, and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. we also have the ability to stop gadhafi's forces in their tracks without putting american troops on the ground. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and more profoundly our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are. some nations may be able to turn a blind eye to atrocities in other countries. the united states of america is different. >> the unite
.msnbc.com. good evening, rachel. >> in the united states of america, we are used to thinking of ourselves as a super power and throwing our weight around when he feel the need to. only when you take a step back and take a wide historical view that you realize one of the consequences of that self concept is that we end up feeing that need to throw our weight around quite a lot. we go to war all the time big wars, little wars, yum wars and wars. america fights a lot of wars. >> the participation will be for a limited period, but i concluded there is no alternative to returning to lebanon if they are to have a chance to stand on their own feet. grenada is a friendly island paradise for tourism. it was a colony getting ready as a bastian to export terror and undermine democracy. we got there just in time. >> at 7:00 eastern time, air forces of the united states launched a series of strikes against the headquarters, terrorists for 70s and military assets that support mo ma gadhafi's activities. >> allied forces began an attack in iraq and kuwait. these attacks continue as i speak. >> let me sa
in germany. >>> and, made in america. the family who said we could take away everything in their house made overseas, stunned by the truth. tonight, we show them how it looks when we buy only from workers right here at home. >>> good evening. they are our parents, our neighbors and we learned today that by the millions they are vulnerable to a kind of invisible elder abuse. it was all brought home by the original all-american kid in the old time movies, mickey rooney, who is now 90 years old. he silenced the room on capitol hill of his story of financial abuse, bullying and shame. adding, if it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. and abc's claire shipman watched it all today. chair claire? >> reporter: diane, it is estimated that as many as 3.5 million americans are victims of elder abuse. it does have a broad definition. it can be physical abuse, it might be neglect, it might be sheer theft, which is what mickey rooney talked about in his wrenching testimony, where he said all of them can cause devastating psychological consequences. he plays to the crowd wherever he goes. a dashin
the obvious. america has to get its fiscal house in order. how we got here is debated but certain things are indisputable. we have two wars that have been paid for on the credit card. we had tax cuts that went to the high income americans that are on the credit card. we recently extended them at the cost of $700 billion to the deficit. we had irresponsible behavior on the part of wall street that required rescuing the financial system in america so that main street could fight and survive another day. and then that led to a collapse in the economy and 10% unemployment that required governmental action in order to try to stabilize the economy. we have a long way to go in restoring the economy, but that has to be our first mission. the republican proposal on how to address this budget in these continuing resolutions will fail. the reason it will fail is because it fails to do what must obviously be done if we're going to have long-term fiscal stability and that is put everything on the table. the cuts that are proposed by the republican majority, unwise as they are, cannot do the job. the
that america is watching and we can ill afford for the governor to start implementing measures -- i guess i'm shooting myself in the foot. it's coming to maryland on the 14th. i expect to see some of those young socialist-communist in the background when i watch msnbc to be standing at the rally, if i go at all. they would love to see him recall. if they do, the rest of america will fall behind him. host: next is a democrat in ohio. what do you think? who was the winner and loser in wisconsin? caller: i think the loser is the middle class. the gentleman who was just on is just a case of how the middle class is pitted against each other. huge tax breaks are given to people who make huge amounts of money and middle-class people are arguing amongst each other about things we should not be able to -- we should not have to argue about. people were properly taxed like they're supposed to be, they would not be having these arguments. i'm not saying that we should not have a competitive business community, but come on. they are making huge amounts of money. i say go on wisconsin. wisconsin is showi
on the line for democrats. go ahead. caller: hi. the last time i checked, america was a place that all people could live. i think muslims are people. christians are people. we should tolerate one another. if you want to get angry in this country, there's enough things to get angry about. there are loss of freedoms. there are interfering into other people's countries and their businesses and their ways. we are not going to be satisfied in this country until we run ourselves all the way down into the dirt. host: again, if you like to contact us, you can dial in on the phone numbers. we have set aside our fourth phone line for muslims in the u.s. this morning. 202-628-0184 is the number for you to call and you can also contact us via e-mail or twitter. from "the washington post" this morning, "house hearing to bring debate on islam to the fore." host: that is from "the new york times -- that is from "the washington post." good morning. caller: in republican -- i am republican. i wanted to vote for george bush, but i felt there was going to be a war. i was told that republicans usually engage in
with the president of georgia, talking about his relationship with russia and the events of 2008. >> america's main value for peoples like us, and there are many of us out there, right s that america, besides having power or economic leverage, it's also an idea t is a much bigger than than just another country. that is what makes america so strong. there is more freedomses it there in the world, it's much more pragmatic. and that's, i think there is nothing that can stop freedom. it's inevitable this is going to happen. and america should lead it. and i think should not be scared of it. >> rose: we conclude with film producer peter guber talking about the art much storytelling. >> i had it backyards. i spent 35 or 36 years about storytelling. and i realized that the secret sauce was telling purposeful stories, using that as emotional transportation. and that looking at the people you want to act together or work with you or be a customer or clients or join your church or whatever, that they aim with the heart and what you have to aim at the heart is the story, not the facts and information. importa
. at this point, america was in the throes of a cold war and our great nation was viewed with cynicism. the peace corps showed the world the enduring values of peace, commitment to national service and an optimism that had been lost in the cold war and world war ii. under the masterful direction of sargent shriver, it grew to 1,500 volunteers. i was one of those early recruits. i found myself in peace corps training and found myself in medellin, colombia. i saw the grinding cycles of poverty that left so many men, women and children without hope. i committed then to work to end the culture of poverty. it is in no small part due to that experience in the peace corps that i am standing here in the congress. yes, i will yield. mr. dreier: i'd like to con gradge late my friend for his service in the peace corps. he not only served then but he continues to share that with us today and as we deal with countries around the world, the peace corps has been very important and i'm happy to recognize their 50th anniversary. mr. farr: thank you, mr. dreier. over the past 50 years, the peace corps has shown th
to keep the nation's longest >>> six flags is now hiring for their 2011 season. six flags america held its job fair at the park. the company needs 2,500 people to work at the park this spring and summer. new to the job fair this year, auditions. those doing the hiring can identify the most outgoing applicants and tap into hidden atlantis they might have. >>> learning more tonight about an alleged massive price fixing scheme involving 21 airlines that have been charged. the government claims the airlines conspired with competitors to inflate passenger and cargo fuel surcharges between 2000 and 2006. the airlines paid more than $1.7 billion in fines. 19 executives have been charged with wrongdoing. four have gone to priz's. among those convicted, british airways, korean air and air france. no major u.s. carriers have been charged. >>> gas prices continue to climb. still ahead tonight, what all of this could mean for our fragile economy. >>> and wipeout. the kodak moment. that did not go as planned. standing by with an update on ♪ ♪ hello sshe ♪s yocan be ♪ove u [ chuckl ] o ur morod
served on the board of directors of the armenian assembly of america, the board of governors of the michigan design center, the detroit chapter of the armenian benevolent union and the seeds of peace. he was an associate in the founders society of the detroit institute of arts and was involved with the armenian library. edgar also founded the detroit chapter of the armenian american business council. edgar was named man of the year by the canadian armenian business council in 1995. in 2002, he was inducted into the international institute heritage hall of fame, and edgar was awarded the 2005 ellis island medal of honor. this prestigious award was to honor ancestral group who through struggle, sacrifice and success helped build this great nation. edgar deeply loved his community and his community loved him. always mindful of his humble roots, edgar always endeavored to better our world. he was a mentor to many and an avid patron of the arts, a philanthropist. he led companies to donate in excess of $70 million in goods and services to local charities. sadly on march 27, 2011,
defend the constitution of the united states of america. we commissioned a survey by public opinion strategies, one of the most respected polling organizations, and let me tell you what they found. in spite of all that talk about it being about the economy and jobs, and jobs and the economy were critical, they found that 32% of the entire electorate on november 2 was made up of conservative and evangelical christians who voted 70%-21% republican, and they were the booster rocket that drove the biggest landslide in a century, and will be the key to victory in 2012 and again. i know that sometimes when people go to washington they lose 20 i.q. points, and some have more despair than others. there is a tendency sometimes among the punditocracy to think that moral issues should be kept out of polite conversation. that social conservatives should ride in the back of the bus. my message to the national republican party tonight is simple -- if you turn your backs on the pro-family-pro-life consider freezing -- constituency, you will be consigned to permanent minority status. some have sugg
pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has passed s. 23, to amend title 35, united states code, to provide for patent reform in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: after consultation among the speaker and the majority and minority leaders and with their consent, the chair announces that when the two houses meet in joint meeting to hear an address by the honorable julia gillard, prime minister of australia, only the doors immediately opposite the speaker and those immediately to his left and right will be open. no one will be allowed on the floor of the house who does not have the privilege of the floor of the house. due to the large attendance that
to atrocities in other countries. the united states of america is different. and as president, i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. >> susan page, on this question there seemed to be a little bit of conflict in the speech. on one hand the president said libya was a special case. on the other hand he made this a little broader statement which gave you a hint at what the obama doctrine was in a case like this. >> well, the obama doctrine seems to be if there's a big humanitarian crisis looming, and we can act to help, we will, except if we don't have international support. or except if -- i mean it's not exactly a clear, bright, primary color kind of doctrine, it's something that mitt romney criticized as knew wanted. nuanced. supporters would say nuance is a good thing in a complicated world. but i think you could read that entire speech and not be clear on exactly the circumstances which would command u.s. military response and those that would not. i think that's a fair criticism of the speech. >> yeah, chuck. i think, you know what, it wasn't so m
atlanta a better city. georgia a better state, and america a better country. just how, i do not know but i have the faith to believe it will. and if i am right, then our suffering is not in vain. .. >> before we get started, i wanted to mention the upcoming events that includes james carroll on march 11 with his new book, and unger on april 4 more "american tempest: how the tea party sparked a revolution." others include billy collins and governor duvall patrick. you can find more information in the events flier. after the talk this afternoon, there's time for questions after which there's a book signing at the table, and you can get signed copies up at the registers. when you know you buy a book from the harvard bookstore, you're supporting a local institution who cares about books, and this author series would not be possible without that support. we are pleased to have c-span's here recording for book tv. if you have a question, wait for the microphone to come to you before asking your question. now is a good time to make sure you silenced your cell phones. this afternoon, i'm pleased t
here in america. king flat out says he doesn't care if it's politically correct. the main witnesses that we're going to see that he's invited are family members of those inspired to get into terrorism. and also an american muslim that will talk about the culture of his community. t.j., last night, eight democrats on this committee wrote king asking him to cancel the hearing, saying it too narrowly singles out the community. listen to eric holder. >> we don't want to stigmatize, we don't want to alienate entire communities. we need to focus on individuals or groups of individuals, who might band together and who would try to harm american interests or american citizens. that is what this justice department is doing. >> now, i spoke with congressman king last night, he insists he does not want to demonize the muslim-american community. he also said, look if my job is to look for radicalization from al qaeda, where else am i going to look? one of the issues that king says drives him a report that he gets from his friends and law enforcement community at home in new york and around the
's, and the largest fireworks display ever seen in america. generations of new yorkers commemorated november 25th as evacuation day, an anniversary that of the folded into the more enduring november celebration of national togetherness, that is giving day. what if you had not wanted the british to leave? mixed in among a happy new york crowd there were other less cheerful faces. colonists who had sided with british, the departure spelled lawrie. during the war tens of thousands of loyalists had moved for safety into new york and of the british held cities. the british withdrawal raised urgent questions about their future. what kind of treatment could they expect? jailed, attacked, retain their property or hold on to their jobs? confronting real doubts of their lives, liberty, and potential for happiness in the united states, 60,000 loyalists decided to take their chances and follow the british elsewhere into the british empire. it took 16,000 black slaves with them bringing the total exodus to 75,000 people or about one in 40 members of the american population. it travel to canada, sell for brita
of america is business. two saturdays ago, i was at south by southwest, a very exciting activity that takes place in austin, texas, it not only promotes the live music industry, which is huge in austin, live music capital of the world, but in addition, it promotes entrepreneurship among people with new, great ideas. and those new, great idea people, all -- i talk to them, they are so excited. such great young people. many of them in the high tech industry but in all the industries. those young people sat there and told me the one thing you can do that would hurt us the most is tax stock options and put up regulations that would prevent me doing what i need to do in my project. so if the government will stay out of my way and if you won't impose taxes on the very source of investment money that i'm seeking as a new entrepreneur, if you don't do those two things and you stay out of the way, i've got an idea that can change this country. and many of them have just those ideas. some of the things we have now like facebook, those things like they made a movie about and all that stuff, all that w
. and three times i will ask, god, please, god, please, god, please continue to bless america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee, mr. cohen, for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in opposition to chairman upton's dirty air act. in 2007, the supreme court issued the massachusetts vs. e.p.a. decision directing the e.p.a. to examine greenhouse gas emissions and their impact on the public health. e.p.a. conducted a highly credible peered review scientific analysis under the bush e.p.a. and the obama e.p.a. this was not a political analysis. it was a scientific analysis. but that has not stopped the chairman from trying to legislativively undermine scientific fact. according to the e.p.a., president nixon's clean air act will prevent 230,000 premature deaths and result in $2 trillion in economic benefits in 2020. but chairman upton has decided with much help from corporate polluters, lobbyists that the fiscal and physical well-being of the american people are less important than big oil's import
that is, that would end up being the largest tax increase in the mystery of america on the american people -- if you're not going to do it through legislation, we'll do it through our regulations through the environmental protection agency. and so there was an endangerment finding. the administrator of the e.p.a. had the endangerment finding, and it was based on the ipcc flawed science. nonetheless, it was there. and so they started on a route to regulate co2 through regulations. let's stop and think about what that would be. the cost that we have determined over a period of ten years now to take over the regulation and have -- tph-fbgs a type of cap-and-trade -- in fact a type of cap-and-trade through regulation would be about $300 billion to $400 billion a year. i estimated what that would cost an average family in oklahoma. it was about $3,000 for each family that pays, that actually files a tax return. you have to ask the question: what you get if you pass this. first of all, i think most of the people right now are concerned with the price of gasoline at the pump. it's going up again.
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., march 17, 2011. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. mcconnell: mr. president? the presiding officer: the republican leader is recognized. mr. mcconnell: it was a great honor to have thad austin of murfreesboro, tennessee, provide the opening prayer this morning. i -- i thank him for his wise words. i first met the reverend austin as an alma mater at the university in willmore, kentucky, when i visited there in 2007. it is to engage the world and serve the world through public service. our guest chaplain has pursued that mission with great success. maybe it is a family calling.
that npr hates committee a look -- hates in middle america. plain and simple. are you listening and c-span radio? caller: yes, i do. host: keep an eye on the road. caller: is it true that we have pretty much worked out the 2012 but -- budget, well on our way? host: i would say we are far away from that. caller: what i think is going on with the 2011 is an exercise by the politicians, both democratic and republican, tea party, whatever, to make it look like they are actually busy by opposing things that are unreasonable on both sides. it is useful because it brings up the topic of everything as a possible item that can be cut. i think the 2011 exercise is going to be an exercise. and the two extensions -- federal workers in constant fear of their jobs and livelihood. i think the 2011 exercise will be a continuing resolution for the rest of the year. then it will get to work for 2012. host: thank you for calling and thank you for listening on c- span radio. you can find us at 90.1 fm but you can listen nationwide on xm channel 132 and streamed on the web at c-spanradio.org. an e-mail --
about tightening the belt, but nobody talks about the companies in america tightening their belts. if we went back to a flat tax, no tax break, no tax shelters, everyone pays 10%, that would help our economy, the american families, and it would let big business pay what they should pay. guest: here is one of the big issues we are dealing with that. people at oil companies are making a lot of money. we are dealing with a major energy crunch right now. people can look at oil companies and say, they have record profits and we have record high prices. the fact is, we are dealing with record high prices in oil. if we could add energy from our own country, we could manage that and it would be different. fluctuations from overseas would not still be occurring, at this point. people also talk about oil companies getting tax breaks. it is that ability to write off their business expenses. it is the same as other companies. people say that they are larger and these small companies, but they are, they are larger businesses. people want to pick on that. what would they do if they pulled that out? th
of government agencies and services, and harm america's children, our students, our working class, and our seniors. an estimated 700,000 jobs would be lost. all of this pain delivered in the name of deficit reduction and the growing economy. yet, mr. president, the facts are clear. this is the wrong direction for our nation. mr. president, we face our current fiscal situation primarily because of falling revenues brought about by unpaid tax cuts especially for the wealthiest americans and because of ever-rising entitlement costs. every nonpartisan report on finding a solution to our current fiscal crisis stresses the need for comprehensive solution, a solution that includes cuts in discretionary spending, both defense and non-defense, as we will as cuts in entitlement spending and, yes, the need for additional revenues. just yesterday "the new york times" published a story about the efforts of the junior senator from virginia and the senior senator from georgia who honestly examine what it will take to solve our fiscal challenges. according to that story, even if congress cut discretionary
or what combination of sources will actually turn out to be best for america. and that should be cause for those of us here in congress to be extraordinarily careful in trying to predetermine what sources should either win or lose. we're always talking around here about we need to steer clear of picking winners and losers, and yet that seems that's what we do all the time. a diversity of energy sources provides the best proving ground and insurance against overreliance on any one source and a healthy economy provides the best demand for the cleanest sources available. winston churchill once said, "on no one quality, on no one process, on no one country, on no one route and on no one field must we be depend hent. safety and certainty in oil lie in variety and variety alone. now, winston churchill was talking about oil but his words are just as applicable to our need for diversity in all of our types of energy. now, finally, the need to make our energy domestic to the greatest degree possible is something that we've all known. we all know that we need to do this, but we have failed to do
satellite corp. 2011] >> everywhere and europe and and america, your people agree with it. the whole people are against you. your governments, your regime will go down. host: a defiant response just two hours ago from libyan leader gaddafi as missiles continue to hit key targets overnight. 48 deaths were reported. this is the largest international military effort since the iraq war. today's military action taking place the same weekend egyptian residence are going to the polls to vote on the senate -- is changes to its constitution. voters in haiti going to the polls to select a new president. our president and rio de janeiro, day to bureau of his south american trip where his focus is on jobs, trade, and the economy, and congress is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "stri
rolls. but our favorite thing is eating totino's pizza rolls. ♪ we're the kids in america oh, oh, oh oprah: how did you tell your comment. he said, "oh, i knew." >> i never really grilled you to find out what you thought you elimination. you'd been through went really well. you had all >> was that a giveaway? surprised, and frankly, as long as she's happy, i really didn't oprah: you really didn't care. family that i guess i haven't imagined that i could, and this about being my mom or finding me about all of your faults and all of the mistakes. do you have any could've done it better. i wish do, you know? it's all a to do is be better than i did last time, but i log that and book where you were talking about when you'd hear his driveway and the kids were you'd move to action fast. oprah: "battle stations." yeah. for herself. thank you. ropia vida. you so much. nancy, thank you so much, and, family, thank you. "untied." it's in bookstores [captioned by the national ♪ ♪ hello sunshine ♪ sweet as you can be ♪ iove waking up [ chuckles ] ♪ to your morning melody ♪ i can tell
. then you have to decide is that a person you trust, at a time when america clearly needs to have veryrtundamental challenges. >> greta: you have now converted to catholicism, when and why? >> it was a long process. calista was born into a catholic church and very devout. she sings in the choir as a spouse i went in a supportive way. over time, being there, participating, experiencing the mass, i tell people it wasn't so much that i converted as it was that i god wallly became catholic and one morning realized what happened. i find it a -- nurturing and comforting experience ands that made me feel more at peace than any other time in my life. >> greta: more with newt gingrich. straight ahead, you just heard from newt gingrich. do not go away. there are four more. hear from the other four possible presidential contenders in iowa. rick santorum is next. also admit, you have been waiting for this. more breaking news about charlie sheen. first his tv show was put on hiatus. then his children were taken away. now a bigger bombshell. we'll tell you what is going on with charlie sheen, stay tun
the white people in america all shook up. they cannot stand it because he was a black man. george bush -- host: you think this is about race? caller: part of it is, peter. i can understand why white people cannot see the racist element of it. if he was a black bush, you could see it. host: omaha, nebraska, on the republican line. just then, how you think the president has handled the libyan conflict so far -- justin? caller: i do not approve of the present -- he has shown that he is loyal to one group of people, the bankers. we have no business in libya. if this was such an issue, why did we allow this for 40 years or some of their other nations closer. at least it is a coalition. i am not interested in anything the united nations says -- host: what did you think of the iraq war during the bush administration? caller: i am a veteran of the iraq war. i was there in 2004 when it was still pretty fuzzy -- when there was no government and nothing going on. i was a bit younger than. that was almost 10 years ago. and it took me about two weeks of being there to figure out that this was a sca
>>> good morning, america. i'm dan harris. >> and i'm bianna golodryga. it's saturday, march 26th. this morning, nuclear apology. japanese officials issue an extraordinary and rare public apology to workers who are exposed to massive amounts of radiation. were they deliberately misled? and what about new reports of a huge crack in one of the reactors. >>> food fears. you find it in so many foods that children eat. why the government says it could be making more kids hyperactive. >>> facebook taking over. one are the seven words no person wants to hear? your father just friended me on facebook. we'll tell you why that's more likely to happen than ever. >>> and swimming with sharks. this is one of those what was he thinking moments. incredible video of a man who is not afraid to get up close and personal with the king of the ocean. >>> that guy did what any ration beachgoer would do. he would get out of the water with the shark. >> a nonpredatory shark. but that's a big risk to take. >> i would be doing that move when you crawl up under your beach blanket and hide. >> mommy? >> exac
about it. think about the history of innovation. what sets america apart is so many of our great inventions start out in small garages and labs with driven, inspired people who have great ideas, developed them and then they take off. i mention companies that have started this way yesterday. hewlett packard, apple, google, and there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of others. they started from humble beginnings, and they grew spectacularly, creating jobs for millions of americans and lifting up our economy and standard of living. i know an inventor who invented sky vodka, and the vodka he drank disturbed his stomach, so he figured out biologically and chemically what it was, and he invented a vodka called sky vodka. small inventor. that company was subsequently sold, i think for a great deal of money, but it started with one man who had a stomachache from drinking vodka. now, this may be just one type of example, but apple is certainly another type of example. a garage many years ago in california, and out of that emerged this giant company. so these companies start from humble
the homeowners. we've got 12 million mortgages in america that are currently under water and yet this program , this program which was actually rolled out in march, started about six months ago, has 245 applications. 245. how many have actually made it over the hurdles and have gotten some help and refinanced? 44. 44 refinances. we've got $8.12 billion that has been obligated, we have $50 million that has been dispersed. now, a quick back of the envelope calculation, that's $1.1 million per mortgage refinanced thus far. if we look at it even further, were these million-dollar mortgages? actually the average mortgage was about $300,000. so we spent the american taxpayers, in terms of their dollars, we spent $1.1 million in order to refinance a $300,000 loan. the administration said, we're going to have $1.-- 1.5 million homeowners get into this program. and yet we've taken almost a year, we have 44 that have actually gone through. if you were to get through this program, if you were one of the lucky ones, one of the 44, clearly it's not going to help you in so as you're going to destroy your c
in our back yard. there is going to be a price to be paid for this. it's the working folk of america paying the price while the privileged get off scott free with these republican governors. it is morally wrong. get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question is, do you think -- excuse me -- who do you think will buckle first in the wisconsin budget standoff? text a for the senate republicans, text b for the wisconsin 14. to 622639 or go to our blog at ed.msnbc.com and we'll bring you results later in the show. joining us now is john nichols, washington correspondent of "the nation." good to have you with us tonight. i understand there is a statement that was put out today by senator bob jauch and basically we have his statement, we're rolling it up for you right here. since governor walker introduced this legislation, i have talked with republican lawmakers and former thompson, governor thompson cabinet officials every day to seek a pathway to find common ground. those conservatives revealed that six or seven republican senators hated the collective barga
display ever seen and north america. generations of new yorkers commemorated november 25th as the evacuation day, an anniversary that was later folded into the more enduring november celebration of the national togetherness, thanksgiving day. but what if you hadn't wanted the british to leave? mixed in among the had the new york crowd that november day, there were other less cheerful faces. for loyalists, colonists who sided with britain during the war, the departure of the british troops felt worried, not jubilation. during the war, tens of thousands of loyalists moved for safety into new york and other british help cities. the british withdrawal now resurgent questions about their future. what kind of treatment could expect in the new united states? would they be jailed, would they be attacked, but they retain their property or hold onto their jobs? confronting real doubts about their lives, liberty and potential happiness in the united states, 60,000 loyalists decided to take their chances and follow the british elsewhere in to the british empire. they took 15,000 black
's what we did today in homes all across america: we created the electricity that powered the alarm clocks and brewed the coffee. we heated the bathwater and gave kelly a cleaner ride to school. cooked the cube steaks and steamed the veggies. entertained dad, and mom, and a neighbor or two. kept watch on the house when they slept. and tomorrow we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. [ technician ] are you busy? management just sent over these new technical manuals. they need you to translate them into portuguese. by tomorrow. [ male announcer ] ducati knows it's better for xerox to manage their global publications. so they can focus on building amazing bikes. with xerox, you're ready for real business. you have frequent heartburn, right ? yeah, it flares up a few days a week. well, we're the two active ingredients in zegerid otc. i'm omeprazole, the leading prescription heartburn medicine. and i'm sodium bicarbonate. i protect him from stomach acid so he can get to work. look, guys,
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight, reports of a possible deal for gadhafi's exit, as president obama tells the nation, he was right to order military force. >> i am convinced that a failure to act in libya, would have carried a fair greater price for america. >>> medical breakthrough. this woman lost 75 pounds and lost her diabetes. the surge may erase a deadly disease in a matter of hours. now, giving hope to millions of americans. >>> caught on camera. a child waist-deep in quick sand. and he's not the only one. >> we have two kids in what seems to be quick sand they're sinking in and can't get up. >> this morning, the amazing story of survival. >>> and are you ready for britn britney? britney spears, finally. the concert event that took over san francisco. and wait until you see what our "gma" cameras caught backstage with her. and get this. britney has something special she wants to share with you this morning, right here. >>> good morning, everyone. i cannot get britney's music out of my head. the global superstar, as you have never seen her before this morni
-- america >> reporter: that the question for many americans is simple -- how can this be legal? the supreme court answered. speech is powerful, chief justice john roberts wrote in the court's opinion. it can stir people to action, move them to tears of both joy and sorrow and as it did here, inflict great pain. we cannot react to that pain by punishing the speaker. the court held that because the protests deal with public issues -- gays in the military, war in iraq -- they are protected under the constitution. we do not stifle public debate, roberts wrote. >> this is the kind of case that is going to have an influence for generations. it is the supreme court standing up and giving constitutional protection to extremely unpopular speech. it's really what the first amendment is all about. >> reporter: this ruling was a sharp disappointment to the family of lance corporal math matthew snyder who was killed in iraq and whose funeral was picketed. >> we found out today that we can no longer bury our dead in this country with dignity. >> reporter: but the westboro protesters do now have a license
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